Choosing the correct wheelchair

There are many different criteria that need to be considered when looking at finding the perfect wheelchair; the type of chair that you require can vary heavily depending on your personnel requirements and desired use. There are obviously medical requirements that need to be considered when choosing a chair, but beyond that there are a few main criteria which can help guide your choice.

  • Independent use – First you may wish to consider if you will be using the chair mainly by yourself or with an attendant. If by yourself you may prefer to use a self propelling wheelchair. Similarly, if you are often helped by an attendant that will also play its part in your decision and you may wish to invest in a wheelchair with a powerpack, in order to aid the attendant, especially up steep hills.
  • Frequency of use– Usability of the wheelchair may well be important to you, for example you may only want to use it whilst you’re out and about, in this case a lightweight folding wheelchair would be most suitable, as they are easy to store and travel with. However if you’re a frequent user of the chair you may want to choose a more heavy duty wheelchair or consider a wheelchair cushion in order to aid comfort and reduce sores.
  • Cost– Though maybe not paramount, as with any purchase cost is an important factor to consider.  There is a wide variety available in the wheelchair section on the Discount Mobility web site, from very affordablebudget wheelchairs to more expensive heavy chairs.
  • Sport– Some users may wish to purchase a wheelchair they can use whilst playing sports. In this instance you are best suited to choosing a light sports chair, specifically designed to your sporting needs, often with inward facing wheels for control.
  • Level of disability– You may not be in a position to manually push your own chair, but having your own freedom remains important. In this scenario, electric wheelchairs are an excellent solution. You may also have a disability that requires extra support from a chair in which case a positioning chair is more appropriate.

There is perhaps more choice amongst wheelchairs then any other disability aid, the sheer variety and choice is often a daunting prospect.

If you’re at all unsure about which wheelchair to go for, or would like more personalised guidance, call Discount Mobility for friendly, helpful advice. Browse the entire range and order online at http://www.discount-mobility.co.uk

About Discount Mobility: Discount Mobility stock an extensive range of mobility aids, including wheelchairs, scooters and rise and recline chairs at significantly reduced rates.

Pride Go Go Elite Traveller 4 Mobility Scooter at Special Price

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Discount Mobility is now offering Pride Go Go Elite Traveller 4 Mobility Scooter at a discount price of £484, lesser than the market price of £1659.

Speaking about the features of Pride Go Go Elite Traveller 4 Mobility Scooter, it is very much streamlined, but remains very steady during use, permitting users to feel confident whether they are in or outdoors.

Pride Go Go Elite Traveller 4 offers great flexibility. The steering tiller can be tilted up and down. The seat rotates and the armrest folds up. It is easily portable and also makes it much simpler to take the seat off prior to packing the mobility scooter into a car.

Pride Go Go Elite Traveller 4 Travel Mobility Scooter has wireless controls, so fixing it together again after it has been taken apart is a fast and hassle-free process.

You can either buy this product at the offer price of £484.00 or you can avail a finance option. You need to spend £13.83 Per Month for 48 months and your instant finance get approved in 4 minutes at Checkout.

Discount Mobility, one of the top selling mobility aids in the UK is well known for its quality, quick delivery and unbeatable price. We sell our mobility products online through the store http://www.discount-mobility.co.uk .

All you need to know about Mobility Scooters.

There are around 330,000 users in the UK for whom mobility scooters provide a lifeline to the outside world giving them their freedom and independence. With models ranging from the 4mph class 2 up to the 8mph class 3, these machines can be difficult to manoeuvre and so accidents do happen.
Here is a list of things you need to know when using a mobility scooter on the road.
Mobility Scooters that can be used on the road are known as a Class 3 ‘invalid carriage’.
• On the road scooters can travel at a maximum speed of 8mph.
• If used on footpaths, the maximum speed is 4mph.
• A class 3 vehicle must be registered with the DVLA.
• For a class 3 vehicle you need to have a tax disc, but this is free of charge.
• You have to be at least 14 years old to drive a Class 3 mobility scooter.
• If you are using the road, follow the rules that other road users follow. This means road signs and traffic lights. Use your mobility scooter’s lights, indicators, and horn.
• Take other road users and pedestrians into account.
• Never drive your mobility scooter on the motorway.
• Insurance is not required for mobility scooters, but it is recommended.
• You do not need to pass a driving test to use a mobility scooter on the road or pavement.
• Keep your scooter roadworthy and well maintained.
• If you have a Class 3 mobility scooter, use the pavement if possible.
• If you are using the pavement, follow the rules that other pedestrians follow (or should follow).
• Pedestrians have priority. Remember not all pedestrians will see you. People with a sight or hearing impairment or other elderly or disabled people might not be aware you are there, and they may not move out of your way.

If you want more information on the specific models of mobility scooters we at Discount Mobility can offer, you will find a selection in our shop site www.discount-mobility.co.uk or you can phone us on 01245 905144 and talk to us about your needs.

Can a smart insulin patch mean no more diabetic injections?

“A ‘smart’ insulin patch could replace painful injections to help millions of people with diabetes keep their blood sugar levels in check,” the Daily Mirror reports; though the technology has only been tested on mice.
Insulin is a hormone that plays a vital role in regulating blood glucose levels. People with type 1 diabetes, as well as advanced type 2 diabetes, require regular insulin injections, as their body either doesn’t produce enough insulin or reacts to it in the wrong way.
Researchers have developed a new type of glucose-sensing patch, which is worn on the skin and delivers insulin in response to sensing high levels of glucose.
The study showed that the patch was capable of reducing blood glucose levels to normal in mice with chemically induced diabetes over about four hours.
This research is at an early stage, so we therefore don’t know if it will be both safe and effective in humans. Before any human testing can occur, researchers will need to study the longer-term effects on animals. Researchers will also need to work out whether they can deliver enough insulin to regulate blood glucose levels in humans, and how often the patches need to be changed.
All in all, we wouldn’t expect to see these patches at your local chemist in the near future.

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Is Being a ‘couch potato’ linked to increased anxiety risk

Is “Being a couch potato bad for your mental health,” the Mail Online reports. However, the evidence gathered by a new review is not as clear-cut as the headline would lead you to believe.

The review summarised the results of nine studies on the link between anxiety symptoms and sedentary behaviour, such as using a computer or watching TV.
Overall, five of the nine studies found a positive link – that as time spent sitting went up, so did the risk of anxiety symptoms.
However, the results of a review are only as reliable as the studies it includes, and in this case they weren’t very good. The majority of studies looked at sitting and anxiety at one time.

This can’t prove cause and effect, as we are faced with the classic “chicken and egg” dilemma: does sedentary behaviour cause anxiety symptoms, or are anxious people likely to spend more time sitting?
Importantly, we don’t know whether the studies took account of other factors that could be influencing the results, and most looked only at anxiety symptoms, not a diagnosis of anxiety.

Overall, this review doesn’t provide conclusive proof of a definitive link. The occasional boxset binge is probably not going to trigger general anxiety disorder by itself, but it is important to balance this out with regular exercise. Aside from the physical health benefits of exercise, it can also often reduce feelings of depression and anxiety.

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Arthritis Living Aids

If you suffer with Arthritis we have carefully selected a range of items that may help make everyday tasks a little easier.

But What is Arthritis?

Rheumatoid arthritis, or RA, is a form of inflammatory arthritis and an autoimmune disease. For reasons no one fully understands, in rheumatoid arthritis, the immune system – which is designed to protect our health by attacking foreign cells such as viruses and bacteria – instead attacks the body’s own tissues, specifically the synovium, a thin membrane that lines the joints. As a result of the attack, fluid builds up in the joints, causing pain in the joints and inflammation that’s systemic – meaning it can occur throughout the body.

There are two types of OA – primary and secondary. Primary osteoarthritis is generally associated with aging and the “wear and tear” of life. The older you are, the more likely you are to have some degree of primary osteoarthritis. However, not everyone gets it – not even the very old. That’s because OA is a disease, and not part of the normal aging process. Secondary osteoarthritis, in contrast, tends to develop relatively early in life, typically 10 or more years after a specific cause, such as an injury or obesity. Osteoarthritis occurs most often in knees, hips and hands. Other joints, particularly the shoulders, can also be affected. OA rarely affects other joints, except as a result of injury or unusual physical stress.The pain and stiffness of osteoarthritis can make it difficult to do daily activities including your job, play sports or even get around with ease. That’s why it’s important to learn all you can about this disease, how it affects you and how to live with it – a process called self management.

Osteoarthritis.There are two types of OA – primary and secondary. Primary osteoarthritis is generally associated with aging and the “wear and tear” of life. The older you are, the more likely you are to have some degree of primary osteoarthritis. However, not everyone gets it – not even the very old. That’s because OA is a disease, and not part of the normal aging process. Secondary osteoarthritis, in contrast, tends to develop relatively early in life, typically 10 or more years after a specific cause, such as an injury or obesity.

Osteoarthritis occurs most often in knees, hips and hands. Other joints, particularly the shoulders, can also be affected. OA rarely affects other joints, except as a result of injury or unusual physical stress.

The pain and stiffness of osteoarthritis can make it difficult to do daily activities including your job, play sports or even get around with ease. That’s why it’s important to learn all you can about this disease, how it affects you and how to live with it – a process called self management.

What is Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes develops when the insulin-producing cells in the body have been destroyed and the body is unable to produce any insulin.

Insulin is the key that unlocks the door to the body’s cells. Once the door is unlocked glucose can enter the cells where it is used as fuel. In Type 1 diabetes the body is unable to produce any insulin so there is no key to unlock the door and the glucose builds up in the blood.

Nobody knows for sure why these insulin-producing cells have been destroyed but the most likely cause is the body having an abnormal reaction to the cells. This may be triggered by a virus or other infection. Type 1 diabetes can develop at any age but usually appears before the age of 40, and especially in childhood.

Type 1 diabetes accounts for between 5 and 15 per cent of all people with diabetes and is treated by daily insulin injections, a healthy diet and regular physical activity.

Type 2 diabetes develops when the body can still make some insulin, but not enough, or when the insulin that is produced does not work properly (known as insulin resistance).

Insulin acts as a key unlocking the cells, so if there is not enough insulin, or it is not working properly, the cells are only partially unlocked (or not at all) and glucose builds up in the blood.

Type 2 diabetes usually appears in people over the age of 40, though in South Asian and black people, who are at greater risk, it often appears from the age of 25. It is also increasingly becoming more common in children, adolescents and young people of all ethnicity.

Type 2 diabetes accounts for between 85 and 95 per cent of all people with diabetes and is treated with a healthy diet and increased physical activity. In addition to this, medication and/or insulin is often required.

Disabled holidays – Make a difference

Are you planning to give a surprise gift of a holiday package to someone in your family? You have thought of a great idea that they are going to remember for a long time. Most disabled persons lead a life confined to their home and office and never think of holiday trip due to their physical condition. However, it hardly means that they don’t wish to get away from their daily monotony and have an awesome holiday by the seaside or countryside.

While arranging for disabled holidays you need to remember that the facilities for travel and accommodation have to be a little different and a bit more. You cannot just blindly book their tickets and hotel room without thinking. In fact, you need to do some research before you set out to do it. Here are a few tips that might help you in that.

  • Make all the plans before you start out. Of course, it needn’t be a strict plan that stifles the person. At the same time it has to be a well-thought out plan that ensures that the disabled person comes across no inconveniences or hardships due the disability he or she has.
  • Find out which place would be suitable for the person. You could find out from him or her what kind of place they would like to go such as a tropical island with sunny beaches, a quiet countryside, cool mountain ranges, etc. You can actually get advice from the person’s doctor as to which place would be suitable for their health.
  • Once you decide on the place do some extensive research on these places and find out the different facilities available for disabled holidays. With the Internet at your fingertips, this is an easy job now. Check out the flight arrangements provided for the disabled and the facilities at the hotel. You can also check whether the activities that the place provides like sightseeing or other entertainment can be easily carried out by the person.
  • For a disabled on holidays there are several concerns like food, medicine, toilet, etc. that the person might not easily discuss with anyone. As the person who is arranging the holidays, it is important that you think of all these and get the necessary details from the patient directly or from the caretaker. And when you make your calls to make the arrangements do remember to tell the hotel representative about the conditions so that they are ready.

When you are arranging for disabled holidays, you might have to consider a lot of factors that you needn’t bother if you are arranging an ordinary vacation. However, you’ll see that the happiness that you give to the person would be just worth all the trouble you take and all the money you spend.

Guide to Choosing a Mobility Scooter

A mobility scooter can be a life-changing purchase that helps a person gain more mobility and independence. Not all mobility scooters are the same, of course, so it’s advantageous to do a bit of research on a variety of features and options so that you can make an informed decision before investing in a new scooter. Here are some considerations that will help you make the right choice:

Weight / Size:
Some scooters are built for larger people. Some are adjustable. Keep the size/weight requirements in mind when making a decision about which scooter meets your needs so that you can ensure it will be a comfortable ride. There are scooters with basic seating for short rides and those with more support and stability for people who need it and / or for people who will spend more time in their scooter.

Terrain:
Some scooters are designed for outdoor use and some are built for the pavement but don’t operate as well on rougher terrain. Some are better suited for indoors. When making your choice, pay attention to these specifications so that you can match them to the type of usage you anticipate.

Power & Control:
Mobility scooters are most often powered by battery. Knowing how long it takes the scooter to charge and knowing how long the charge will hold should be considered as well as the types of batteries it takes (as well as expense incurred if batteries don’t have a long lifespan). Controls are another consideration. You’ll see varying control options available and will want controls within easy reach. Your mobility limitations may directly impact which types of controls are preferable to you.

Storage:
Will you be using the mobility scooter to do shopping and /or will you need to carry special medical items, such as oxygen equipment? Some mobility scooters only have a small storage basket whereas others are built to carry items. The same goes for storing your scooter. There are larger models and smaller versions available. Because you’ll have to store it on your property you’ll want to keep size in mind, particularly if you don’t have a lot of room.

Traveling:
Will you be transporting your scooter in a car or van on a frequent basis? If so, you may want to look at a travel scooter that’s easily folded and transported in a car boot. Some models are heavier and take up far more room than travel scooters.

Warranty:
Warranty period will vary, depending on the scooter you choose. Keep warranty in mind when making a choice about which scooter is right for you. Some models have an excellent warranty overall but don’t include certain things like lights, upholstery, etc.

Cost:
Costs are obviously a concern and there is a large gap between the most expensive mobility scooters and the cheapest mobility scooters. Some scooter companies offer financing (at varying interest rates). Some people find that their medical insurance pays for certain scooters but not others. Before choosing on price alone look at product reviews of scooters, too, to increase the chances that you will find good value for your money.

Self Propelled Wheelchairs

There are many people who rely on mobility aids for their everyday activities. One of such main mobility product is wheelchairs. There are many types of wheel chairs like lightweight wheelchairs, transit wheelchairs, heavy duty wheelchairs and self propelled wheelchairs.
Self propelled wheelchairs are gaining importance these days as these wheelchairs have larger rear wheels to enable the occupant to propel themselves. The seats of these wheelchairs are made of vinyl which is very strong, thin and lightweight. Another benefit of Vinyl is that it is easy to clean and stains can be easily removed by wiping it with a warm wet cloth.

Discount Mobility sells branded self propelled wheelchairs with amazing discounts. Get to know on a few of them below:

Enigma XS Aluminium Self Propel Wheelchair

 Enigma XS Aluminium Self Propel Wheelchair
Price from £375.00
You save £190.00
Offer Price £185.00

20” Lightweight Aluminium Wheelchair Self Propel

20'' Lightweight Aluminium Wheelchair Self Propel

Retail Price £299.00
You Save £114.00
Offer Price £185.00

S1 Budget Steel Wheelchair Self Propel With Mag Wheels

S1 Budget Steel Wheelchair Self Propel With Mag Wheels

Retail Price £205.00
You Save £100.00
Offer Price £105.00

You can buy more products from here http://www.discount-mobility.co.uk/c77821/self-propelled-wheelchairs.html